BUKULJA

Key Facts

Size: 38.5 km2
Ownership: 100% Jadar Resources
Status: Permit Granted
Targeted mineralisation: Pegmatities and Greisens

Project Highlights

• ~90km ESE of Rio Tinto’s world-class Jadar Project
• Geology has been mapped & described by various government & academic geologists since at least the 1970s leading to the recognition of mineralised bearing pegmatites & greisens
• Covers part of the Bukulja granitoid complex which is overlain by younger Tertiary sediments to the east and Quaternary sediments to the south. There is potential for economic minerals in both the granitoids as well as within the Tertiary sediments
• Has a long mining history with placer tin deposits being mined along the rivers at Bukulje since the Bronze Age
• Elevated Li (up to 800ppm) and tin

The Bukulja project area is located to the immediate south-west of the town of Aranđelovac within the Sumadija district in central Serbia.

Figure 1 - geology of the Bukulja project area

Aranđelovac is located at the northeast foot of Mount Bukulja (696 m), at an altitude of 250 m. The project area has a rolling terrain varying from 300 masl to Mount Bukulja at 696.0 masl in the east of the exploration area. The climate at Arandjelovac is continental, with smooth transitions from one season to another. Summers are moderately warm with an average temperature of 21.3o C with little rain. Most of the precipitation occurs during the spring and late autumn with snow falling on an average of 43 days at Arandjelovac and 62 days on Bukulja. The climate of higher sections of the project area would be affected by the altitude resulting in cooler average temperatures and longer periods of snow. Highway M-4 passes east-west through the centre of the municipality with easy access to Belgrade 80 km to the north.

Local Geology

The Bukulja tenement covers part of the Bukulja granitoid complex which is overlain by younger Tertiary sediments to the east and Quaternary sediments to the south. There is potential for economic minerals in both the granitoids as well as within the Tertiary sediments.

Granitoids

The Bukulja granitoid complex is made up of several varieties of granite with a lenticular shape stretching east-west covering approximately 40 km2. The granitoids have been deeply affected by surface weathering resulting in the granitoids near the surface resembling crumbly conglomerates and sands.

The centre of the complex is mainly granular biotite and muscovite granitoids with the northern and western edges composed of fine grained and aplitic granite-monzonite. Biotite granitoid varieties occur in the central parts of the complex where a higher degree of erosion is observed. The main granitic complex has been intruded by a stockwork of younger late stage pegmatites. The mineral composition of granite grades from monzonites to more alkali granite. Common rock forming minerals in the granitoids and pegmatites include biotite, muscovite, quartz, albite and plagioclase along with accessory minerals including garnet, magnetite, tourmaline, zircon, allanite, sphene, beryl, apatite and monazite.

Contact Metamorphosed Rocks

Fine-grained gneisses locally alternating with skarns occur along the eastern and south-eastern perimeter of the pluton. Muscovite-biotite schists containing andalusite, sillimanite and garnet along with marble of variable widths from a few meters to several hundred metres occur elsewhere along the edges of the pluton.

Sediments

Sarmatian sediments, mainly composed of crumbly sandstones, cover a small portion of the east of the tenement. Pannonian sediments occur in a small area and are represented by yellow and grey-green loose sands and sandy clays. Bedding is rarely observed. Coarse Pliocene clastic sediments of occur along the Preseka ridge and on the southern slopes of Bukulja, in the vicinity of Vukosavci. Quaternary sediments associated with the larger rivers - Lepenica, Rača, Jasenica and Kubrušnica, have the largest distribution to the south of the tenement.

Exploration Target

Bukulja is prospective for mineralised pegmatites and greisens.

Exploration and Mining History

Placer tin deposits had been mined along the rivers at Bukulje since the Bronze Age.
The geology of the Bukulje district has been studied since the 19th Century however the geology of the Bukulje region has only been mapped and described by various government and academic geologists since at least the 1970s leading to the recognition of mineralised, especially lithium and tin, bearing pegmatites and greisens.
Other than the small-scale ancient mining, there is no record of any substantial mining of pegmatites or greisens in the granitoids or of Jadarite deposits in the Miocene sediments in the district.

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