CER

Key Facts

Size: 92.8 km2
Ownership: 100% Jadar Resources
Status: Permit Granted
Targeted mineralisation: Pegmatities and Greisens

Project Highlights

• ~10km N of Rio Tinto’s world-class Jadar Project
• 1km from jadarite basin
• The Cer district has a long mining history with placer tin deposits being mined along the rivers at Cer since the Bronze Age
• Geology has been mapped & described by various government and academic geologists since at least the 1960s leading to the recognition of mineralised, especially lithium and tin, bearing pegmatites and greisens
• Granitoid Complex shows metallogenic association with Lithium with elevated Lithium Boron and Tin

The Cer project is located within the Macva administrative district centred on Mount Cer in western Serbia. Macva is administered from the town of Sabac which is located on important traffic routes: roads, railway and river, approximately 30 km to the north-east,

Figure 1 - geology of the Cer project area

Mount Cer, a granite tor, is a prominent topographic feature of the local area with an altitude of 687 m and has been the site of several important historic battles including the first victory of the Allies during the First World War on the 19th August 1914. The Cer district has a long mining history with tin being mined at Cer since the Bronze Age.

Local Geology

The oldest rocks within the Cer tenement are Devonian and Carboniferous shales and sandstones developed to the east, north and west of the central Tertiary granite massif. Miocene to Pliocene sandy clay and gravels are found along the Lesnica and Cernica river valleys which drain off the granitoid massif to the south and south-east.

Granitoids

The Tertiary Cer Granitoid Complex (granodiorite 24-28 million years and pegmatite about 20 million years) formed as two stages of intrusion. The older granodiorites form the western, central and north-east parts of the massif and are represented by biotite and biotite - amphibole variants, usually exhibiting hypidiomorphic grain structures. The younger granite varieties are of particular importance for their development of the numerous pegmatites and greisens that host the economic minerals. They are spatially widespread in the south-eastern and north-eastern parts of the massif.

The pegmatite veins, 10 or so metres long, intrude as a stockwork of veins usually approximately 20 cm thick, rarely 50 cm or more. In the south-eastern sector of the massif, between the villages of Milina and Trbisila, there are pegmatite zones along prominent ridges that clearly indicate the frequency and abundance of pegmatite bodies in this part of the massif, which are intensely affected by metasomatism (dominated by calcium and sodium metasomatosis and tourmalinisation) and carrying rare metal mineralisation that is not present in other parts of the complex.

Some 67 major pegmatite bodies have been identified at Cer; predominantly potassic feldspars with quartz, microcline, plagioclase with lesser muscovite, biotite, beryl, tourmaline, zircon, apatite with isomorphic outgrowths of microcline and albite. Cassiterite, scheelite, columbite, rutile, uraninite, monazite, thorite, allanite and other metallic minerals have all been identified in these pegmatites.
Alluvial deposits containing local concentrations of heavy minerals (cassiterite, tantalum-niobite, magnetite, rarely monazite, very rarely euxenite, allanite, scheelite) sourced from this complex are found in the main rivers.

The greisens, i.e. rocks of quartz-mica composition carry high concentrations of tin and bismuth with minor niobium, tantalum and beryllium. These greisen zones are usually small-scale (up to several tens of m2) are located at the source of Milinska River along ridges and on the slopes of the central part of the massif. A few small greisens have been also mapped in north-western-eastern and south-eastern part of the massif.

Exploration Target

Cer is prospective for mineralised pegmatites and greisens.

Exploration and Mining History

Placer tin deposits had been mined along the rivers at Cer since the Bronze Age. The geology of the Cer district has been mapped and described by various government and academic geologists since at least the 1960s leading to the recognition of mineralised, especially lithium and tin, bearing pegmatites and greisens.

Rio Tinto, while exploring for borates in the nearby sedimentary basin discovered the extensive lithium/boron Jadarite deposits. Other than the small-scale ancient mining, there is no record of any substantial mining of pegmatites or greisens in the granitoids or of Jadarite deposits in the Miocene sediments in the district.

311-313 Hay Street Subiaco

Western Australia 6008

+61 8 6489 0600

info@jadar.com.au